Media Swap this weekend!

Done with that book? Looking for a good summer read - check out Swapsity's Book Movie Music Eco-Swap this Sunday at the Harbourfront!

Swapsity is a community dedicated to promoting 'collaborative consumption' and reducing waste by swapping and sharing what you don't need anymore with someone else. In three years, Swapsity has organized over 27 swap events, saving over 30,000 items from landfill and saving Torontonians an estimated $200,000!

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TO's Sharing, Swapping & Repairing Community

Swapsity_media_swap.jpgThe best way to reduce waste is to avoid it in the first place. By sharing things, swapping what we don't need anymore, and repairing what we have we can avoid buying 'stuff' and build community at the same time.

Toronto hosts a whole range of great community initiatives to share, swap and repair!

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Toronto's garbage future: burn, bury or recycle?

The City of Toronto sends almost 500,000 tonnes of garbage to the Green Lane landfill each year - just under half of all of the waste collected in the city. If Toronto continues at this rate, Toronto's Green Lane landfill will be full by 2026.

This summer, the City is looking at what to do over the next 30-50 years with Toronto's growing garbage and a key issue is whether to bury garbage in a new landfill, or to burn it in an incinerator. However, based on City waste statistics, we know that a lot more can be done to reduce, reuse and recycle it in the first place.

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What's in the Garbage Bag?

Figuring out what to do with our garbage is a big decision, but there's a lot that we can do to reduce garbage in the first place.

Two-thirds (66%) to 89% of what Toronto households put out in their garbage bag could be recycled, composted or reused in Toronto's waste diversion programs. If you consider new and emerging recycling technology and markets, that number could go even higher!

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Cigarette butts and the environment

Tired of cigarette butts littering the street? Cigarettes butts aren't just ugly to look at, as litter, they're also harmful to the environment.

Cigarette filters are not biodegradable, they're plastic, and full of toxic chemicals that are harmful to our waterways, our soil and our wildlife.

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Waste Free Summer Feasts

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Eating outdoors is a great way to enjoy Toronto's green spaces, but with picnics often comes plastic forks, disposable cups and napkins.

How can we make sure that our time enjoying nature isn't harming the environment?

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TEA's Household Waste Study found a lot of garbage!

Loretta_Ing_Audit_(square).jpgLast fall, TEA asked our members to let us take a look at what's in their garbage to get a bit more detail on what exactly Torontonians are throwing out. Many families volunteered, and even a few TEA staff joined in!

We learned a lot - and so did our members. From a single person living downtown, to a family in a condo in the suburbs, all of our members had a story to share and something to learn from the experience.

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Community Environment Days

CEDay_-_Ewaste_Loading.jpgCommunity Environment Days are annual events held in each ward in Toronto, hosted by the local Councillor.

These events are an opportunity for residents to drop off special waste and talk with solid waste staff right in their own neighbourhood.

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A Waste Free Toronto is possible

Bins_on_street_-_square_CDrost.jpgIt’s a sad fact that Canadians generate the highest amount of waste per person compared to similar nations around the world: 777 kg per year for every person in Canada.

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Education is essential for a Waste Free T.O.

Apartment_Bin__Garbage_-_smaller.jpgGarbage and recycling rules are confusing. Each city can have different recycling rules, and Toronto regularly adds new things to the Blue Bin to recycle more.

Even more confusing is that what you can recycle at home is different from what you can recycle at work, or at the shopping mall.

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